Vitamin D Discovered to Not Prevent Falls

For many, higher doses of vitamin D has been seen to help with extremities in elderly patients. However, it’s been recently discovered that the higher doses of this vitamin are no longer more effective than lowering doses to help improve the lower extremity functions in elderly patients and no longer is associated with lower risks of falls.

In this new study about 200 patients over the age of 70 were put into three treatment groups, with one receiving 24000 IU of vitamin D3 monthly, while the other had 60,000 and the third had 24000 plus calcifediol. The second and third groups were more like to reach the serum level of vitamin D rather than the first group.

Now that the supplements weren’t more effective in improving lower extremely function, it changes a lot of things. The highest incidence of falls were in the 60,000 group and in the 24,000 group plus calcifediol. By comparison, the 24000 had the lowest number of falls and the high monthly doses of vitamin D plus the calcifediol actually may not be what seniors need because it can create potentially deleterious effects on falls. Of course, there is future research and information needed to prove these findings to be valid though.

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There is little evidence that to achieve the 30 ml/L works, so the ideal thing is to have the right amount of vitamin D. Ideally, what people should be doing is to have a balanced diet that naturally contains this vitamin instead of just relying on supplements. Supplementation is supported by random trials and updated meta-analyses, so it’s important to follow the recommendations on your vitamin intake, which is 800 IU of vitamin D each day.

There is also another study on supplementations done. All of the participants had to have had a low-trauma fall in the last year and to live at home. They had to be able to walk, use public transport, and to attend clinical visits, along with discontinuing the calcium and vitamin D supplements. They also needed to score well on the mini mental state exam and understand the procedures to give consent.

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In this, the trail was done at a single center and double-blinded. Nine of the participants stopped the treatment but they were kept in the trial. Function was also looked at, which included physicals, medical history, blood and urine, and an appendicular muscular mass absorptiometry. From this, the participants noticed that the scores of these people didn’t differ very well in each treatment group. This came to the conclusion that the clinicians shouldn’t recommend vitamin D supplements for better health benefits to prevent falls, as there is no evidence that it reduces the risk of these sorts of issues. From this, it’s safe to say that the best and optimistic way to really help your body to help prevent falls is to get the recommended amount of vitamin D and make sure that it’s from real foods and not from supplements.